A – Z of Living with Dyspraxia R is for

A – Z of Living with Dyspraxia R is for

A - Z of Living with Dyspraxia R is for

A – Z of Living with Dyspraxia R is for

R – R is for Rejection

As an adult living with dyspraxia you might find you have come away from certain situations and experiences with a sense of rejection. It could be an interview, a moment in the classroom, in the workplace at home with family or friends.

The world was not designed with dyspraxia in mind. Quite the opposite. The world is tailor-made for people with a certain standard of ability in a few particular areas. This is changing, surely but slowly. dyspraxic’s should always keep this mind when dealing with a sense of rejection or alienation. The world is designed for

Dyspraxics should always keep this mind when dealing with a sense of rejection or alienation. The world is designed for non-dyspraxic’s and people without neurological conditions.

Feeling rejected

A sense of rejection may come in the form of a job interview in which you were unsuccessful in getting the job. Or it could come in the form of participating in a social event such as a game of darts and be noticeably poorer at it than your peers. (requires hand eye coordination)

With the two examples, an adult living with dyspraxia may get the same sense of rejection but for very different reasons.

In my view, it is an almost like a case of there being direct and indirect causes of feeling rejection as an adult living with dyspraxia.

Direct causes

An example of a direct cause of rejection when living with dyspraxia is not being successful in a job interview and the reason provided being that they are unable to provide you with the support you need.

Indirect causes

A social setting in which time is spent with friends and even close family can present its self as an indirect cause of rejection when living with dyspraxia.

That is because of it easy for a person living with dyspraxia to feel rejected if they feel that their needs are not being taken into account. Of course, that is true of everyone but when living with dyspraxia a person may need support in areas that friends and family have simply not considered.

Overview

Everybody, no matter if they have dyspraxia or anything else, has to deal with rejection as various points throughout life; and all have to learn how to deal with it in their own way.

R is for rejection because when living with dyspraxia having a sense of rejection is a common occurrence.

 

 

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